BEAUTY

I’m Convinced Tea Is Giving Me Better, More Resilient Skin

I love tea. Since becoming caffeine curious (and weaning off coffee), I started drinking a lot of tea — iced, Earl Gray, Chamomile, Sleeptime — and other than the obvious downside of teabag waste, I’ve been telling anyone who will listen about the benefits, which for me have included better sleep, calmer mornings (read: less anxiety), and interestingly, more resilient skin.

On the skin benefits specifically, my tea consumption has actually been double-pronged: I’ve been drinking it, yes, but also rubbing a tea-leaf compound on my face. Not a literal teabag, but the new Fresh Beauty Tea Elixir.

Earlier in July, I flew to France to learn about the Fresh’s newest formula innovation that extends beyond its existing Black Tea collection (which is also very good, particularly the firming eye serum). I drove two hours south of Paris to a rural location known as the “cosmetic valley,” a business cluster of different laboratories that produce beauty products, to the LVMH lab where all the Fresh skincare is made.

The exotic Mauritian tea plant

I got an official lab coat and clogs (no open toes allowed) and enter into the sterile room with microscopes. There, I learn about the exotic tea plant that inspired the team of Fresh scientists: This tea plant grows on the island of Mauritius, in the middle of the Indian Ocean, where the soil is volcanic and inhospitable for most vegetation. That’s one resilient tea plant, thought the scientists, and thus began the five-year process of sourcing then microscopically decoding the Mauritian tea plant’s genetic adaptations to see if there could be a human skin-care connection.

Biologist Dr. Anne-Laure Bulteau and her team of Fresh researchers determined that the Mauritian tea plant’s resiliency comes from adaptive phytocompounds, like citrate and polyphenols, which essentially act as

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BEAUTY

Is Estrogen the Key to “Good” Skin?

Is Topical Estrogen the Answer to Youthful Skin?

Is Topical Estrogen the Answer to Youthful Skin?

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Anyone who experiences a monthly menstrual cycle is well aware of how shifting hormones effect the skin. Around ovulation, your skin peaks: it’s clear and naturally radiant. The days leading up to the start of your period are your skin’s flop area: it’s dull, oily, and maybe a few zits have popped up on your skin.

This downgrade in appearance is due to the dip in estrogen that occurs at the tail end of your cycle, but a similar shift in the hormone (along with progesterone) happens as you enter preimenopause and menopause. The body naturally begins to produce less estrogen, which can make the skin appear dull, saggy, and dry. You can also experience breakouts as these changes happen, too.

It’s impossible to prevent the hormone shifts that come with this stage of life, so unsurprisingly people have taken to Google to find out if estrogen can be applied to the skin topically for a quick fix. According to Spate, searches for “estrogen face cream” are up 102.8%.

You won’t find estrogen in moisturizers at Sephora, but there are ingredients that mimic its skincare benefits. Ahead, dermatologists explain the role estrogen has on the skin, how to make up for the loss of estrogen with the products in your skincare routine, and more.

RELATED: Hyper-Targeted Menopause Products for All Your WTF Symptoms

What Role Does Estrogen Have on Skin Health?

Estrogen is a hormone that’s important to many bodily functions — including maintaining what’s considered youthful skin. “Estrogen aids in the prevention of skin aging when at appropriate levels and it’s for this reason that the features of aging skin appear as we get older and, most prominently, during peri- and post-menopause when estrogen levels decline

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