FASHION

What To Expect at New York Fashion Week FW24

Where September represents a livelier and party-filled New York Fashion Week, February returns to the basics with clothes at the core – breaking some of winter’s frost with their captivating designs. In New York City specifically, the season represents a time of heightened focus for brands to curate cohesive collections and refine their design expertise.

With this year’s calendar, a roster of designers is taking to the catwalk for their Fall/Winter 2024 collections. From names like Helmut Lang to Michael Kors and Thom Browne, there’s a range of moments to be on the lookout for featuring highlight returns, seasoned New York Fashion Week names and even a few newcomers – taking place from Friday, February 9 through Wednesday, February 14.

Highlight Returns

Last September’s NYFW, Peter Do held his first runway show as Helmut Lang’s new creative director in an attempt to return the brand to its former glory. With his signature tailored sentiments, Do brought a clean edge to the NYC-based label while maintaining its minimal stylings. Since then, Do offered up a clean collection for the Pre-Fall 2024 season, but now the designer is returning to the runway for his second show at Helmut Lang. Peter Do’s second show at Helmut Lang is set to kick off NYFW on Friday, February 9 at noon.

Edvin Thompson’s Theophilio is also back on the runway roster, marking its first show since September 2022. Culture remains at the forefront of the Jamaican-born designer’s process and each collection has seen him dive deeper into his roots. Tommy Hilfiger returns to the calendar as well, having not shown during NYFW since September 2022. If the past show was any indication – making a grand spectacle at Brookly’s Skyline Drive In – Hilfiger’s next on the runway will surely be a

Read the rest
Read more
FASHION

Pharrell Williams At Louis Vuitton: Why It Makes Sense

Rapper, singer, songwriter, record producer and now menswear creative director.

Analysts and forecasters reacted to Pharrell Williams’ recent appointment as creative director of menswear at Louis Vuitton without surprise. If anyone could fill the shoes of the multi-hyphenate late designer Virgil Abloh, it would be Williams.

“Pharrell is one of the most well-known multi-hyphenates,” says Sarah Unger, president and founder of Cultique, a cultural insights and strategy consultancy. “He crystallized our understanding of the industry-agnostic cultural appeal a musician can have. LV is a very multi-hyphenate brand—beyond a typical fashion house. Pharrell will have lots of arenas to play in.”

Williams is a logical move, following Abloh, and is no stranger to fashion. He created streetwear brands Billionaire Boys Club and Ice Cream footwear, and partnered with brands like Adidas and Moncler.

“There is no doubt that Pharrell will likely make his unique impact based on his outsized style sensibilities,” says Hemant Kalbag, managing director, Alvarez & Marsal Consumer Retail Group. “But I don’t anticipate a fundamental directional change. That said, Pharrell will help keep LV relevant to the next generation of LV customers.”

Williams will showcase his first collection for the French luxury house in June during Men’s Fashion Week in Paris. The show will mark five years after Abloh’s celebrated debut collection for the brand, where the audience included: Kanye West, Kim Kardashian, Rihanna, ASAP Rocky, Takashi Murakami, Travis Scott and more. More than 2,000 guests attended the event, held at the Palais Royal,

Read the rest
Read more
FASHION

Nail Any Interview With These Outfit Guidelines, According to an Expert

Office culture transformation means widespread change across a high volume of variables, but when it comes to fashion, dressing for interviews in the post-Covid workplace has its own set of rules.

Whether virtual, hybrid or in-person, potential candidates and employees are dressing a bit more casually all across the board. To start your job search, you can create a free profile at ZipRecruiter.com to apply for jobs with just one click. Yet, the “Casualization,” or the concept that “dressing has become much more casual,” was a trend already underway pre-Covid, according to a McKinsey & Co. report, and the pandemic accelerated a sentiment that had been steadily brewing.

More from WWD

That means consumers have demonstrated an increased interest in athleisure, and as more casual office wear is expected, the athleisure market is set to reach $551 billion by 2025, growing by 25 percent, according to GlobalData.

While it seems we’re all leaning into this mass casualization both in the workplace and at home, it doesn’t necessarily extend to prospective new employees, or those within the interview process. 

“When I started my agency in 1997, it was such a different time,” says Elizabeth Harrison, CEO and founder of H&S, who estimates that she’s interviewed hundreds of people at all different levels of management, from SVPs to interns. “I would say the expectation of how people show up for an interview has evolved. Being neat and well put together is still very important, but what’s changed is what connotes neat and put together is a lot wider now.”

This evolution of business casual, as well as our societal shift towards greater inclusivity, means that many offices, from corporate to creative, have thrown out a lot of the outdated rules in favor of new ones that reflect our collective

Read the rest
Read more
DESIGNER

Pucci’s Fashion Experience; Alexander McQueen’s London Show; Mother of Pearl Launching Sustainable Capsule

The Pucci Experience: While practically synonymous with beach holidays, Emilio Pucci has roots in the mountains, too — a fact the Florentine house will bring to life in St. Moritz this winter.

A fashion “experience” has been scheduled for Dec. 8 to 10 at the glamorous Swiss ski destination, WWD has learned.

More from WWD

“The main idea is to emphasize the position of Pucci for wintertime,” said artistic director Camille Miceli, who unveiled her first designs for the storied Italian brand last April in Capri, the jet-set island where founder Emilio Pucci opened his initial boutique in 1951.

Pucci, who died in 1992, was known for his athletic prowess and was a member of the Italian Olympic ski team in 1932. In fact, he was “discovered” as a designer while skiing and by chance met fashion photographer Toni Frissell, who asked to photograph his ski outfit. As legend goes, when she discovered he had personally designed the collection, she asked him to make some women’s skiwear, which was later shown in Harper’s Bazaar, and a career was born.

He began designing skiwear out of jersey fabrics in 1947 and opened his house in 1949, which quickly became famous for colorful, graphic motifs.

Miceli is still shaping the program for St. Moritz, but will surely conjure many Instagrammable moments as she did in Capri, where models lounged on towels doing synchronized leg lifts, and guests participated in yoga classes, lunches and dance parties.

A seasoned creative who was accessories creative director at Louis Vuitton before joining Pucci last September, Miceli said she prefers to “show things in a different way and surprise people. We are a resort and lifestyle brand: We show the clothes in a context.”

Pucci also unveils collections on a see now, buy now calendar,

Read the rest
Read more